Offense: Grading the two-deep depth chart

Dec 11, 2019 | 0 comments


With the regular season over and exam week here, it seems like the perfect time to hand out some final grades for every player on the Gators’ two-deep depth chart. The following depth chart is based on the unofficial one UF released prior to the Florida State game and may not accurately reflect how playing time was actually divvied up.

QUARTERBACK
PlayerCommentGrade
Kyle Trask

He’s arguably been one of the best stories in college football this season. He emerged from a little-known backup quarterback with almost no experience to become one of the top passers in the SEC. With a strong performance in the Orange Bowl, he could approach 3,000 yards for the season. The only knocks on him are his tendency to lock in on receivers at time and his lack of mobility.

A-
Emory Jones

He’s improved drastically since the beginning of the season at going through multiple progressions, finding the open receiver and delivering a catchable ball. His mobility helps open up the running game a bit more. However, his accuracy from the pocket still needs improvement, and he threw several balls into heavy traffic over the middle of the field.

B+

 

RUNNING BACK
PlayerCommentGrade
Lamical Perine

The Gators’ struggles to run the ball can be mostly attributed to the offensive line. Sure, Perine probably could’ve made a couple of different cuts throughout the season and made a few more plays, but he improved as an all-around back with his ability to catch passes and pass-protect. Two of UF’s most memorable plays of the season – his 88-yard touchdown run against Auburn and his spectacular touchdown catch in between two defenders at Missouri – came courtesy of Perine.

B+
Malik Davis

While he’s listed second on the depth chart, he received 15 fewer carries than Dameon Pierce. He averaged just 2.5 yards on his 33 carries, and ball security was a major issue. He was a major disappointment in his return from back-to-back season-ending injuries.

D

 

TIGHT END
PlayerCommentGrade
Kyle Pitts

He put together his freakish combination of size and athleticism to become a matchup nightmare for opposing defenses this season. He led the Gators with 51 receptions for 610 yards and scored five touchdowns. He was named First Team All-SEC by both the coaches and the media. He’ll enter the 2020 season as possibly a Preseason First Team All-American.

A+
Lucas Krull

He contributed very little. He caught three passes for 33 yards and struggled with blocking. He announced his intention to transfer last week.

expecting.

D

 

WIDE RECEIVER
PlayerCommentGrade
Van Jefferson

He had a solid season, catching 43 passes for 528 yards and six scores. Still, he didn’t stand out as much as some others at UF’s deepest and most productive position.

B+
Jacob Copeland

He came up huge for the Gators with his three catches for 89 yards and a touchdown at South Carolina, but he also went through large stretches where he disappeared. He needs to become more consistent at catching the ball.

Towson.

B

 

WIDE RECEIVER
PlayerCommentGrade
Josh Hammond

He played a huge role in UF’s wins over Miami and Kentucky. In the former, his 65-yard reception set up the game-winning touchdown. In the latter, he sealed the victory with a 76-yard touchdown run in the waning moments of the game.

B
Freddie Swain

He emerged from the pack as their most explosive playmaker. He caught six passes for 146 yards and a 64-yard touchdown against Auburn, and he scored two touchdowns in the first half against Florida State. For the season, he contributed 35 catches for 496 yards and a team-best seven touchdowns.

A

 

WIDE RECEIVER
PlayerCommentGrade
Tyrie Cleveland

He was their best perimeter blocker and a terrific example of unselfishness for his younger teammates. He caught 22 passes for 300 yards and scored just once. He was also a key player on special teams.

B
Trevon Grimes

He had a solid season with 32 receptions for 484 yards and three scores, but it feels like he’s capable of so much more. It seems like a lot of his catches came down the sideline, which suggests that the coaches don’t feel comfortable enough with his route-running to let him run over the middle. He’s a vertical threat but not much else right now.

B

 

LEFT TACKLE
PlayerCommentGrade
Stone Forsythe

He fared decently well in pass-protection for most of the season, although he had a pair of poor showings against Auburn and Missouri. Like just about everyone else on the line, he struggled with run-blocking. Given his massive size and redshirt junior status, he should be a lot better than he is.

C
Richard Gouraige

He’s played mostly at left guard, although he got a few snaps at tackle over the last two games. He’s viewed as UF’s left tackle of the future, and he’s done nothing to dispel that notion.

B-

 

LEFT GUARD
PlayerCommentGrade
Richard Gouraige

He started four games and looked like UF’s most consistent guard. He’s more advanced as a pass-protector than as a run-blocker, and his future is probably still at tackle.

B-
T.J. Moore

While he’s listed second on the depth chart, Brett Heggie has slid over to left guard when Gouraige moves to tackle. He’s played in all 12 games but mostly on special teams.

INC

 

CENTER
PlayerCommentGrade
Nich Buchanan

He wasn’t quite as good this season as he was in 2018. Because he only weighs 283 pounds, he got pushed around against some of the bigger and more physical nose tackles on the schedule. He wasn’t great, but he was far from the biggest problem on the line.

C
Tanner Rowell

The former walk-on played in all 12 games as a key piece of special teams, but he played sparingly on offense. If something were to happen to Buchanan, Heggie would probably slide over to center.

INC

 

RIGHT GUARD
PlayerCommentGrade
Brett Heggie

He was arguably the biggest disappointment on the line. After a strong freshman campaign in 2017 that saw him emerge as a powerful and tenacious run-blocker, he seemed less aggressive and unsure of himself in his first full season back from injury. He went from being one of the primary reasons UF was able to run the ball to one of the biggest reasons it cannot.

D+
Ethan White

In some ways, his freshman season was similar to Heggie’s. He’s provided a breath of fresh air to the offense with his physical approach to the running game. He needs to continue to get his body into shape and learn the nuances of the position better. He’s one of the only reasons for optimism on the offensive line.

B

 

RIGHT TACKLE
PlayerCommentGrade
Jean Delance

After a first half of the season that couldn’t have gone much worse for him, he picked up his play a bit over the final half of the season. While he still struggled with run-blocking, he made fewer glaring mistakes and penalties in pass-protection. Still, he leaves a lot to be desired.

D
Michael Tarquin

He’s played in just three games while redshirting this season. With another offseason to improve his strength and familiarize himself with the offense, he could challenge Delance for the starting role in 2020.

INC
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